Friday links! Managed expectations edition

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton work the crowd.

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton work the crowd.

You and I both know we’re voting for Hillary Clinton in November. President Clinton II is the best we can expect. Despite a hostile Congress, she’ll oversee three more years of steady growth in stocks and home prices before a second Great Recession finally convinces the Republican Party to embrace expanded social services armed secession. That’s the offer. If you don’t like it, you can vote for Donald Trump. The important thing is that we manage our expectations, not fool ourselves into thinking the 2016 election can change the course of the United States. Today is Friday, and things will never be as good as they were 15 years ago. Won’t you stop being a goddamn stupid baby with me?

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College students not prepared to think about Israel, apparently

A campus protest against Israeli checkpoints in occupied Palestine

A campus protest against Israeli checkpoints in occupied Palestine

I defy you to find the original in his published work, but Howard Zinn famously paraphrased Camus as saying that in history, “it is the job of thinking people not to be on the side of the executioners.” Certainly, this principle has guided academia. Virtually all of the humanities are taught within the framework of historical injustices. We decry the liberal arts major for not knowing much, but he knows about oppression and the system of values it determines. He knows not to be on the side of the executioners. But what happens when two historically oppressed groups come into conflict? One becomes an executioner, and the other suffers oppression of the same kind as latinos in the United States. So runs the logic of the campus debate on divestment from Israel, which the Times reports is breaking the historic coalition between Jews and other minorities.

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Romney continues tour of radness

Dorks from around the world

I’ll admit it: I did not think Mitt Romney was going to be a funny candidate for president. In a primary season that gave us Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum, it was hard to see Romney as anything but the wealthy dowager who hires the Stooges to move her piano. How wrong I was. Fresh from his passive-aggressive tour of London, Romney went to Israel to praise the beautiful per capita income—so much nicer than what you get in Palestine. He attributed this discrepancy to “the power of culture and at least a few other things,” presumably making a praying-exploding gesture with his hands, before adding that it might also be “providence.” He was a hit in Poland.

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