Friday links! Perfection of the form edition

A rendering of the Hemnet Home by Tham & Videgard of Sweden

A rendering of the Hemnet Home by Tham & Videgard of Sweden

Plato knew what was up: while the apparent world is disorganized and forgettable in its particularity, meaning lives forever in the world of forms. Right now, I’m typing from my Chinese knockoff of a Le Corbusier recliner. It could support my gamey shoulder a little better. But the form of a chair—oh man, that thing is perfect. It is, by definition, that which supports my whole body in a sitting position, its function and structure unsullied by actualization. Today is Friday, and every form can be perfected. Won’t you transitive verb phrase of contrasting literal and figurative meanings with me?

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In dark of night, Montana adopts school choice, sort of

Governor Steve Bullock neither signing nor vetoing SB 410

Governor Steve Bullock neither signing nor vetoing SB 410

Republicans in the Montana legislature proposed six bills related to school choice during the 2015 session, and five of them died in committee or were vetoed. The sixth, SB 410, became law by default ten days after it reached Governor Bullock’s desk, where it languished unsigned for the maximum period prescribed by the state constitution. And what did this bill, so radioactive that the governor could not acknowledge its existence, actually do? It provided an income tax credit of $150 for donations to private-school scholarship funds. That’s it. But it constituted school choice, and school choice is bad. In this week’s column for the Missoula Independent, we consider whether what such bills symbolize has become more important than what they do. If you still don’t have enough of my voice in your head after that, you can top it off with my review of a standout release from Missoula’s Howardian. And even after all that productivity, we’ll be back tomorrow with Friday links. Not bad for a middle-aged man with multiple undiagnosed illnesses, right?

 

Since 1978, the cost of college tuition has increased 1,225%

Knowledge is good.

Knowledge is good.

According to Bloomberg, the cost of college tuition has increased thirteen-fold since 1978—more than medical care, at nearly five times the rate of CPI. But that’s because a college education is five times as good now, right? Possibly not—anecdotes suggest that our universities have not become dramatically better at teaching than they were four decades ago, and the record number of bachelor degrees we’ve awarded has not necessarily yielded a smarter populace. It has, however, produced an enormous quantity of debt—Americans owe $1.2 trillion in student loans, compared to just under $900 billion in credit-card debt. The class of 2015 is graduating with an average of $35,00 in debt per borrower; meanwhile, 46% of recent college graduates are working jobs that do not require degrees.

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Combat! blog endorses Ted Cruz for president, because why not?

Cruisin'

Cruisin’

As we enter the final 18 months before the 2016 election, it’s high time Combat! blog endorsed a candidate for president. That candidate is Ted Cruz. Sure, we disagree with most of his political positions and all of his musical ones. But he has the three qualities this blog looks for in a candidate: 1) He is 15% worse at lying than he thinks he is. 2) He is neither a Bush nor a Clinton. 3) He has almost no chance of becoming president. That last element is crucial to our endorsement. We are proud to endorse Candidate Cruz, because we are confident that we will never have to answer for anything President Cruz might do. He clinched the Combat! blog endorsement with this poll.

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Knowing what we know now, I should have smoke-bombed Megyn Kelly and disappeared

Jeb Bush

Today’s Combat! blog is written by guest contributor Jeb Bush.

As a person who might consider someday becoming a candidate for president, I knew the media would try to trip me up with “gotcha” questions. But I also knew that the American people—and, to a lesser extent, immigrants—deserve to learn about their potential candidates’ views. And we all know they can’t get enough Bush. My dad was president, and my brother was president twice. Who knows but I might be elected president three or four times? I mean if I decide to run. Anywho, the other thing my dad and brother both did was start wars with Iraq, which was great. Still, knowing what we know now, when Megyn Kelly asked me if I would have invaded Iraq, I should have dropped a smoke bomb, ninja-twisted her neck and disappeared.

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